Consistency

When I first began writing here, my intention was to write a post every week. It’s something I felt called to do , for myself. Whether or not anyone else read it, I felt called to do it.

But I have not written every week. Why? I’m not completely sure, but one reason is how strongly I feel about creating white space in my life – and truly, finally, doing that consistently. I’ve spent my whole adult life ‘doing,’ filling all my time. While I believed in theory in the concepts of ‘white space’ and ‘down time,’ I left myself very little of either.

Between having a full-time day job, teaching yoga and officiating at weddings, spending time with friends and family time, there hasn’t been a lot of down time. And I am fully aware of how fortunate I am to do all of those things, to have my health and to have a wonderful family and dear friends. Not having enough down time is a problem of privilege. But I’m also learning at age almost-64 that I don’t have to justify making time for myself, either.

At this point, making consistent time for myself is a higher priority than feeling that I ‘should’ write something here every week – or, for that matter, that I ‘should’ do anything. Writing because I ‘should’ is meaningless, and offers no service to others.

So my encouragement to you is that you make prioritizing down time for yourself a consistent aspect of your life. No matter what that looks like for you, make it consistent. For me, that means morning meditation and yoga, evening savasana. Figure out what it means for you and give yourself the gift of making it consistent.

Recommended links (simply because they’re inspiring to me):

Britt B. Steele: the real deal

Francesca Cervero: Always of service to the yoga community

Joy Harjo: first Native American to be named United States Poet Laureate.

Why resting matters

Now that I’ve had a week to reflect on my experience at the Relax and Renew ® Level 1 teacher training course that I took in San Francisco, I realize more than ever how important it is that we allow ourselves time to rest. As I learned from my teacher, Judith Hanson Laster, who has been teaching yoga for 48 years, rest and sleep are different, and we need both. As Judith explained, relaxation and sleep are distinct physiological states. The importance of good sleep has been on most people’s radar for the past few years, but most people still don’t give themselves time to rest. I couldn’t agree more with Judith that if everyone gave themselves 20 minutes every day in a restorative yoga pose, such as savasana (corpse pose), the world would truly be a different place. Yes – 20 minutes. It takes that long for people to truly relax and rest. And it’s worth it – in fact, I believe it’s essential.

From my Restorative yoga teacher training last week in San Francisco: one of the many variations of Savasana.

Try it for a week and see how you feel! It’s like magic in down-regulating the sympathetic nervous system and helping you ‘come home to yourself.’ Yoga is about remembering that, not creating it.

More to come on this. For now, have a restful week.

Recommended links:

Savasana Intensive online course

Why not to skip savasana in your yoga practice

Why you should spend time doing nothing

Movement vs. Exercise

I’m a big podcast fan; there are a bunch that I listen to every week, some every day. I really love the concept of lifelong learning, and I learn nuggets every week from podcasts (for free) that truly make a difference in my life.

This week, I really liked something I heard on Deepak Chopra’s new podcast, The Daily Breath. He was talking about the importance of various building blocks in maintaining health, such as sleep and proper nutrition. In this episode, he mentioned that he likes to think of ‘movement’ rather than ‘exercise.’ For me, this kind of simple reframing can make a tremendous shift in my outlook. I’ve never enjoyed going to gyms, and let’s be honest, if we don’t enjoy/like something, A) what’s the likelihood that we’ll make if a consistent part of our life? and B) isn’t enjoying life the whole point?

So, moving our bodies every day as much as we can is crucial for our health. I stand all day at my laptop while working at my day job – rather than sitting – because it’s healthier and it allows me to move around more, even if it’s something as simple as doing a few backbends, lunges or quad stretches a few times an hour. As Deepak mentioned, he likes to take stairs instead of elevators/escalators, and get off the subway a few stops early so he can walk more. These kinds of small, daily changes make a huge difference over time. It’s why I also make sure I get in 10 15 minutes of yoga at least 5 days a week. What’s your favorite form of movement?

I’m so excited to be heading to San Francisco tomorrow to attend a Restorative Yoga Teacher Training with Judith Hanson Lasater! Looking forward to sharing more on that experience next week. This week, I started a 40-day practice with Sianna Sherman on Yoga International, as well as a 30-day course with David Gandelman on Insight Timer (see below for links.)

Recommended links:

Deepak Chopra’s The Daily Breath podcast

Sianna Sherman on Yoga International: 15 Minutes to Clear the Way

David Gandelman on Insight Timer: The Energetics of Success & Manifestation