Consistency

When I first began writing here, my intention was to write a post every week. It’s something I felt called to do , for myself. Whether or not anyone else read it, I felt called to do it.

But I have not written every week. Why? I’m not completely sure, but one reason is how strongly I feel about creating white space in my life – and truly, finally, doing that consistently. I’ve spent my whole adult life ‘doing,’ filling all my time. While I believed in theory in the concepts of ‘white space’ and ‘down time,’ I left myself very little of either.

Between having a full-time day job, teaching yoga and officiating at weddings, spending time with friends and family time, there hasn’t been a lot of down time. And I am fully aware of how fortunate I am to do all of those things, to have my health and to have a wonderful family and dear friends. Not having enough down time is a problem of privilege. But I’m also learning at age almost-64 that I don’t have to justify making time for myself, either.

At this point, making consistent time for myself is a higher priority than feeling that I ‘should’ write something here every week – or, for that matter, that I ‘should’ do anything. Writing because I ‘should’ is meaningless, and offers no service to others.

So my encouragement to you is that you make prioritizing down time for yourself a consistent aspect of your life. No matter what that looks like for you, make it consistent. For me, that means morning meditation and yoga, evening savasana. Figure out what it means for you and give yourself the gift of making it consistent.

Recommended links (simply because they’re inspiring to me):

Britt B. Steele: the real deal

Francesca Cervero: Always of service to the yoga community

Joy Harjo: first Native American to be named United States Poet Laureate.

Simplify, simplify…

Most of us have heard the quote from Henry David Thoreau, “Our life is frittered away by detail. Simplify, simplify.” This has always resonated with me, and my motto, if I have one, is “As soon as things get too complicated, all your problems begin.” The thing is, as we all know all too well, contemporary life is complicated by nature. But I do think there is a lot we can do to simplify, and it all comes down to awareness and intention.

There are millions of distractions and shiny objects out there. It’s so easy to go down a rabbit hole of something that doesn’t even matter to you. This is why it’s so crucial to stay as present as possible, so that you can recognize when this is happening and, with compassion, bring your focus back to what truly matters to you.

As Oprah would say, “what I know for sure” is that I feel so much better when I keep things simple. Whether it’s planning a yoga class, cooking a meal, writing a blog post – or whatever – tuning in to how something makes me feel and only doing what feels in alignment is the best way to keep things simple. In fact, my word for 2019 is ‘aligned.’ (2017 word was ‘home’; 2018, ‘experiment.’)

It’s a beautiful, sunny Sunday afternoon, so what feels aligned and simple right now is to go outside and read the Sunday New York Times. What helps you to feel aligned and to simplify your life?

Recommended links:

The Absolute Necessity of Doing Nothing

Be More with Less

Slow Your Home

Everything we need to know is in a few Beatles song titles

I started this blog to share positive thoughts and resources that may be helpful to others. It’s a way for me to share what’s on my mind and do my part to add some positivity to the world!

Each time I post, it’s my intention to include links to a few riches I’ve found that relate to the topic. And in the interest of simplicity, one of my main values, these posts will, for the most part, be brief.

So, here goes the first post. Something I’ve been thinking about a lot lately is that everything we need to know is contained in a few Beatles song titles. It reminds me of the book All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten by Robert Fulghum, and here’s a quote from that book: “I believe that imagination is stronger than knowledge. That myth is more potent than history. That dreams are more powerful than facts. That hope always triumphs over experience. That laughter is the only cure for grief. And I believe that love is stronger than death.” 
― Robert Fulghum

Back to those song titles:

~ All You Need is Love

~ Let it Be

~ We Can Work it Out

~ Come Together

Maybe it’s too simplistic to say, but when you think about it, there isn’t much more that we truly need than the concepts contained in those song titles. They’ve been around for a long time, but these lessons are not easily learned. Why do you think that is?

Recommended links:

Oprah’s Super Soul Conversations: Sister Joan Chittister The Time is Now

Matthew Jaidev Duplessie on Insight Timer mediation app

The Abundance of Less: Rainbow Weldon

That’s it for this time. Let me know your thoughts, if there is a topic you’d like me to address here, or if you’d like to guest-post.

Thanks for your time!